John

About John Braithwaite

John Braithwaite leads the 'Peacebuilding Compared' project and is the founder of RegNet (the Regulatory Institutions Network) at the Australian National University.
15 06 2016

Two simple tax reforms

By | 15 June 2016|Categories: Regulation, Tax, Taxation reform|Tags: , |

Most tax reform is complicated to both understand, and to figure out what its real effect would be. Here I advocate two simple reforms that would not necessarily solve any of the major challenges of tax reform, but that would help with its biggest challenges.

One is to dramatically increase taxes on real estate—on both private […]

8 06 2016

Iran: restorative justice and principled engagement

By | 8 June 2016|Categories: Crime, Criminal Law, Restorative Justice, Restorative Practice|Tags: , , , , |

For 24 days in May I enjoyed wonderful hospitality in Iran as a guest of Dr Mohammad Farajiha of Tarbiat Modares University. With his inspiring group of graduate students, Dr Farajiha organized a culminating conference in Tehran on Restorative Justice in Iran*, which was attended by visiting scholars from Iraq, the UK, […]

1 06 2016

Motivational interviewing is effective and restorative

By | 1 June 2016|Categories: Restorative Practice|Tags: , |

I orginally wrote this as a guest blog for the International Institute for Restorative Practices, where I discuss the parallels between Motivational Interviewing and restorative practices, and describe a framework for understanding why these approaches work….

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Well done, International Institute for Restorative Practices, for […]

25 05 2016

Why are wars never fought by women as a group to defend women’s rights?

By | 25 May 2016|Categories: Gender, War|Tags: , , , , , |

Wars get fought for many reasons. Some are to grab territory. Others are to kill an enemy before they kill you. Some are for one part of a country to separate from the rest, often because the separatist region feels that it is marginalized and dominated. Others are for a group with a particular political […]

18 05 2016

New research on shame in the Scientific American Mind

By | 18 May 2016|Categories: Crime, Shame|

A society that does not have a capacity to shame the war crimes of its leaders without tearing itself apart as a society will perpetrate many war crimes. A society whose schools cannot shame bullying without renting the social fabric of schools, destroying the lives of bullies and victims alike, will have devastating bullying problems. […]

11 05 2016

Rethinking forgiveness

By | 11 May 2016|Categories: Crime|Tags: , |

Nicola Lacey and Hanna Pickard[1] draw upon the evolutionary psychology literature in a recent paper to find that both vengeance and forgiveness are universal human adaptations that have evolved as alternative responses to exploitation. This is why all cultures have both retributive traditions (that are more concentrated on out-groups such as invaders) and […]

4 05 2016

New evaluation of responsive regulation

By | 4 May 2016|Categories: Regulation|Tags: , , , |

New ANU Faculty Dr Hai Wu and Dr Stanley Choi recently presented a RegNet seminar on the effectiveness of responsive regulation in securities regulation and financial crisis prevention. This was research of Choi, Chen, Wright and Wu[1] which set out to test the effectiveness of the construction between 1992 and 2006 of the […]

24 04 2016

Lest We Forget Wal, Dick and Joyce

By | 24 April 2016|Categories: War|Tags: , , , , , , |

Today, 25 April, I give the Call to Remembrance at the site of the Sandakan prison camp. From this site the terrible war crime of the Sandakan Death March departed in 1945. My father, Dick Braithwaite, was one of 6 survivors. More than 2400 Australian and British Prisoners of War from the camp perished. Many […]

20 04 2016

“Transitional Justice” for Karadzic?

By | 20 April 2016|Categories: War|Tags: , , , , , |

The conviction of Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic for genocide in Srebrenica, among other crimes, is a step toward justice after war. Yes, many populists in Serbia have publicly criticized the alleged bias against Serbs of The Hague Tribunal. At the same time, my fieldwork for Peacebuilding Compared with Aleksandar Marsavelski makes it clear that […]

5 04 2016

Responding to family violence and institutional violence: new Australian developments

By | 5 April 2016|Categories: Crime|Tags: , , |

Australian governments have so often been an international embarrassment to its citizens in recent times. On family and institutional violence, in contrast, they have really begun to grasp the nettle. Former Prime Minister Julia Guillard’s government recognized that Australia had a widespread problem of different kinds of institutions engaging in sexual abuse of those in […]